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  1. #1
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    Default Benched 175 3x at the gym. My testosterone level is only 124. ?? Explain!

    I benched 175 for 3 reps. I'd say that's pretty good for a 47 year old guy with a testosterone level of 124. I hadn't been benching that much either. The dr wants to do more bloodwork, and if my test is still low, he wants to start testosterone therapy. Has anybody else out there in their 40's gone through testosterone therapy? ("juicing", patches, gels?). How did it go for you? And, is it still possible to be fairly strong with such a low t level?

  2. #2
    Regular Poster Spartan's Avatar
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    Yes, is very possible to be fairly strong with that level of testesterone.

    Your T level could be raised in more natural ways other than chemicals.

  3. #3
    Regular Poster SCStronger's Avatar
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    Squat
    There is no tomorrow! THERE IS NO TOMORROW! THERE IS NO TOMORROW! - Apollo Creed

  4. #4
    Moderator EKnight's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SCStronger View Post
    Squat
    If only that were true!
    Donít chase the 1%, there is no magic training routine or diet thatís going to provide any measurable results over the basic principles for getting huge and strong: Train heavy, eat and sleep more.

  5. #5
    Regular Poster SCStronger's Avatar
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    It worked for me.
    There is no tomorrow! THERE IS NO TOMORROW! THERE IS NO TOMORROW! - Apollo Creed

  6. #6
    Moderator EKnight's Avatar
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    Squatting and deadlifting somehow creating any kind of meaningful higher growth hormone and/or testosterone than any other weight training is a myth. Blood testing has been used to demonstrate this.
    Donít chase the 1%, there is no magic training routine or diet thatís going to provide any measurable results over the basic principles for getting huge and strong: Train heavy, eat and sleep more.

  7. #7
    Regular Poster SCStronger's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by EKnight View Post
    Squatting and deadlifting somehow creating any kind of meaningful higher growth hormone and/or testosterone than any other weight training is a myth. Blood testing has been used to demonstrate this.
    ok...... it still worked for me. Maybe, I got lucky.
    There is no tomorrow! THERE IS NO TOMORROW! THERE IS NO TOMORROW! - Apollo Creed

  8. #8
    Moderator EKnight's Avatar
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    It may have helped your other lifts, but you're not actually making the claim that your blood work showed increased levels of testosterone are you?
    Donít chase the 1%, there is no magic training routine or diet thatís going to provide any measurable results over the basic principles for getting huge and strong: Train heavy, eat and sleep more.

  9. #9
    Regular Poster SCStronger's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by EKnight View Post
    It may have helped your other lifts, but you're not actually making the claim that your blood work showed increased levels of testosterone are you?
    Yes - A few years ago ( as a an over forty new lifter )
    I started a 5 x 5 program with focus on heavy squats and deads .... and over the course of one year, my T levels increased, my % of BF went down, my lift numbers went up, and ( in my opinion ) I felt better -
    Bonus !! My BP went down as did my "bad " cholesterol.........

    now, that is not to say that there were not other factors that influenced the changes ( diet, OTC supplements, Etc)

    All I know is this - data is not usually absolute - studies are and can be flawed - results of studies can be manipulated to produce desired results........ and I know it worked for me, and I "know" that most myths have some basis in truth - the idea that heavy lifting increases free test levels did not come out of thin air...... somewhere, I am sure, there is evidence to support the hypothesis.

    By the way - I have never been rude to you in any way nor have I given you reason to think I was a confrontational type personality - so, why would you ask a question like "but you're not actually making the claim that your blood work showed increased levels of testosterone are you?" that has such an argumentative/ disagreeable tone to it - WTF?

    You may be right - you may be wrong - you may be a genius - you may be an imbicile ...... I do not know and I do not care - I was just sharing my OWN eperience Good luck to you and happy lifting
    There is no tomorrow! THERE IS NO TOMORROW! THERE IS NO TOMORROW! - Apollo Creed

  10. #10
    Regular Poster SCStronger's Avatar
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    http://breakingmuscle.com/strength-c...-press-machine

    A quote from the text:
    An upcoming study in the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research tackled this question. Researchers asked, “What type of exercise will elicit the most hormonal response - machines or free weights?” They chose the leg press and back squat to duel in an epic test of which could produce the most testosterone and growth hormone.





    Ten healthy men volunteered for the study, each with experience in strength training. On one day they performed six sets of ten reps of leg press, starting with 80% of 1RM. On another day, after plenty of rest, they returned to the lab to perform the squat workout, which was also six sets of ten reps, starting with 80% of 1RM. During each of these workouts, the participants were sporting a catheter inserted into their arms so blood could be sampled quickly.



    In a result that surprised no one, barbell squats produced significantly higher levels of testosterone and growth hormone. At the greatest difference, which occurred during the workout, testosterone was about 25% higher when performing full squats versus leg press. But the difference in growth hormone was incredible. Squats produced a full 200% more growth hormone during the workout. Even thirty minutes after the workout, participants who did squats still had 100% more growth hormone as when they performed the leg press
    There is no tomorrow! THERE IS NO TOMORROW! THERE IS NO TOMORROW! - Apollo Creed

  11. #11
    Moderator EKnight's Avatar
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    So, first off, it's very hard to interpret someone's meaning when reading print vs. hearing them, but I assure you the "tone," of the post was not meant to be condescending or rude- I was genuinely trying to determine if you had actual blood work done or were basing your conclusion on anecdotal evidence (in this case, your results). Sorry if that rubbed you the wrong way.

    To the actual topic at hand- if you revisit my comment, you notice I posted that squats and deadlifts do not create, "any kind of meaningful higher growth hormone and/or testosterone."

    The study you cited demonstrates exactly that. The amount of testosterone increase for squats was 31.4 Ī 10.3 nmol/L. That's such an insignificant amount, it isn't going to make a difference at all in increasing strength or size. And it deceased so quickly, that even if such a small bump could create a difference, baseline levels of test are returned to quickly to matter. Among several studies that demonstrate training increases in hormones are insignificant is the following: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/22105707/ which concludes, "We report that the acute exercise-induced systemic hormonal responses of cortisol and GH are weakly correlated with resistance training-induced changes in fibre CSA and LBM (cortisol only), but not with changes in strength."

    So, no, squatting more to increase hormone levels enough to benefit his bench press is a myth. As for your personal results, I'd surmise that your increased test level was more causative of your change in body composition than anything else. This event has been well-documented.
    Donít chase the 1%, there is no magic training routine or diet thatís going to provide any measurable results over the basic principles for getting huge and strong: Train heavy, eat and sleep more.

 

 

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